Murahwa’s Hill

Murahwa’s Hill

 

Murahwa's Hill

About the Site:

Murahwa’s Hill has a unique combination of cultural heritage and indigenous flora and fauna given its location visa-vis the prevailing moisture-bearing winds.  Over the years an extraordinary number list of trees and birds has been recorded.

There are traces of early hunter-gatherers at the site and on the south-western part of the hill there is an early Iron Age settlement of the Ziwa Period (200-400 AD) with a ruined stone-walled settlement higher up that may be associated with the Rozvi Dynasty in its upper levels (late 17th century). The hill is named after a Manyika village-head who was the last local occupant of the site. There are more recent villages of Headman Murahwa who lived here before relocating further south in the Save Valley.

The hill lies at the base of Christmas Pass on the western edge of Mutare. Traditionally it was protected in the past as a place of spirits, while latterly the ravages of seasonal fires have been prevented hence the maturity of the many indigenous trees and the unusual variety of micro-environments present.

Over the years an extraordinary list of trees and birds has been recorded. More than 132 species of trees have been recorded on the property – an exceptionally rich assemblage for such a small area. These comprise Eastern Highlands and Middleveld species, as well as broad range of vines, fungi, mosses and ferns. The diverse micro-habitats include closed canopy evergreen forest on the wetter eastern slopes to drier deciduous woodland on slopes facing Christmas Pass. The rocky exposed slopes, ravines, watercourses and granite outcrops all contribute to the diversity of habitats. It is estimated that the larger forest trees are at least 150 years old.

Bird species include the Silvery-cheeked Hornbill, Trumpeter Hornbill, Livingstone’s and Purple-crested Louries (Turaco’s), Tambourine Dove, Golden-rumped Tinker-barbet, Yellow-fronted Tinker-barbet, Whyte’s Barbet, Gorgeous Bush-shrike, Red-capped (Natal) Robin-chat, and Jameson’s Firefinch.

Over 200 of Zimbabwe’s 500 species of butterfly are known from Murahwa’s Hill. In addition there are many moths, beetles and dragonflies and much observation and research remains to be done.

 

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An Educational and Interpretative/Educational centre is planned for site. The design of the centre is based on a traditional African meeting place, with open sides, thatched roof, timber poles and an open amphitheatre.

Murahaw's Hill

 

The display themes will include: Early history – Stone Age, the Stone Ruins, flora and fauna and the geology of the area.

Directions to Murahwa‘s Hill

At the fuel filling station as you enter the outskirts of Mutare City on the road from Harare, after crossing over Christmas Pass, turn right and after one kilometre, the entrance gate is signposted on your right just before the Mutare Agricultural Showground.

 GPS Reading:

18° 57’ 17.73” S

32° 38’ 35.28” E

Operating Hours:

Murahwa’s Hill is open to the public every day.

End of Year Report on Murawha’s Hill: 2015

Unfortunately the property’ situation has not progressed, through lack of funding.  A lot of the property has been degraded by unauthorised access and theft of wood etc. The plans for a small interpretative/cultural centre, aimed primarily as an educational facility, have been completed. This plan, in conjunction with the National Museums and Monuments of Zimbabwe should secure the property for its long term well-being for the benefit of the people of Zimbabwe.  The NMMZ are currently in the process of declaring the property as a National Monument which should help towards protecting and them developing the property for the schools of Mutare and the district.

  • World Heritage Day Global heritage group mobilising young people in fight to preserve cultural identity Today, the International National Trusts Organisation (INTO) are launching a new resource, ‘Trust Kids!’, a list of 25 things young people can do to explore, celebrate, preserve and share their cultural heritage.  In her annual World Heritage Day Lecture, Dame Fiona Reynolds, Chairman ...
  • Nyanga’s Unique History: Presentations over the Easter weekend “Nyanga’s Unique History” We have pleasure in announcing that two presentations will be taking place over the Easter weekend On understanding Nyanga’s rich archaeological heritage By Mr Robert Burrett,  Archaeologist On Saturday 15th April 2017 At 3 pm and Rhodes Hall, National Park (near the Area Manager’s Office), Nyanga, Zimbabwe Monday 17th April 2017 At 10 am Nyanga Community Library, Nyanga Village, Zimbabwe Entry – FREE! Enquiries: O Bepe 0773050801; ...
  • Spirit of Place Statements The Spirit of Place (SoP) concept was established at the Quebec conference of the International Council on Monuments and Sites in 2008.  SoP is defined as “the tangible (buildings, sites, landscapes, routes, objects) and the intangible elements (memories, narratives, written documents, rituals, festivals, traditional knowledge, values, textures, colours, odours, etc.). It is the physical and ...
  • Property Reports for 2016 You are invited to read our property reports for the year 2016 for the following sites: Rhodes Nyanga Historical Exhibition Mabukuwene and Worlds View The other four site reports will be posted shortly for you to enjoy.
  • 2016 Property Reports The following 2016 Property Reports can be read under the relevant property page: La Rochelle Country House and Spa Rhodes Nyanga Historical Exhibition and Worlds View They all make for a very interesting and uplifting read! Enjoy.
  • Happy New Year The NTZ Council members would like to wish you and your family a happy, healthy and peaceful New Year!   We are looking forward to continuing to work tirelessly to protect our precious national heritage.  
  • Gala Movie Fundrasing Event The National Trust of Zimbabwe will be holding a gala fund-raising event at the Ster-Kinekor cinemas at Sam Levy’s Village, Borrowdale, Harare please do join us and enjoy cheese and wine served before the film  where you will be given the chance to meet the Committee and to support the work of the NTZ.  There ...
  • Book Launch Book Launch On the 30th August 2016, the National Trust of Zimbabwe hosted a prestigious event to launch the publication of ‘Nyanga’s Rich Heritage’ a booklet by Rob Burrett and Edone Ann Logan. Rob and Ann worked tirelessly on compiling this valuable publication which will be a constant companion for those who hold this area of ...
  • National Trust Tribute to Mr Darrel Plowes It is with the deepest regret that we note the passing of Darrel Plowes, in Mutare, on Wednesday 19th October 201 aged 91. Darrel has been an invaluable friend of the National Trust of Zimbabwe for a many, many years and a great source of information and of assistance through his long friendship with Sir ...
  • Rare Orchid flowers for the first time since 1973 The 17th October was a historic day for the Trust and in particular for the La Rochelle property when a rare orchid flowered on the 17th October 2106, this is only the fourth time that it has flowered to our knowledge, the last time being in 1973 so this is a cause for celebration. The orchid ...
  • Rare Orchid in Flower: it last bloomed in 1973 Rare Orchid in Flower We have some exciting news from the La Rochelle Orchid House. The natural hybrid orchid named after Lady Virginia is in flower! This is only the 4th time that it has flowered to our knowledge and the last time was in 1973 so this is quite a special occasion. It is expected to be ...
  • MABUKUWENE Update August 2016 Clearing of the invasive weed, LANTANA, is now underway and with the help of Rob Burrett and Mrs Hugill in Bulawayo we will be able to continue work on this historical property in order to attract more visitors for walks and picnics, birding outings. Plans are also proposed to have a cultural village exhibition at ...

Spirit of Place Statement for Murawha’s Hill

One can almost hear the chattering of little children and the wisdom-filled murmuring of the elders as they sit beneath the trees and on the surrounding rocks in dappled sunlight sharing hunting stories and waiting for the night fires to light up before an evening under the stars; exchanging ancient traditional lore and planning the next day’s hunt.

This is an important place and is respected for the wealth of history it holds, albeit unwritten and perhaps mostly based on assumption and imagination, as there is no record remaining from when the Hill was inhabited by the Ziwa 200-400 A.D., apart from the pottery findings and other remnants from history.

Rich in birdlife and carrying an abundance of indigenous trees, as well as butterflies and other insects Murawah’s Hill is a small sanctuary and natural memorial to the tribe’s people now lost in history.

We owe it to their memory to preserve it and respect it as they would appreciate it.

 

 

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